High Rise Yeast Biscuits

A few weeks ago I visited a local Kentucky bakery. On a whim I picked up a package of rolls. They looked a little hard on the outside but I was intrigued by the name: Biscuits, though they looked a lot more like yeast rolls. The biscuits were amazing! This lead me on the hunt to try and recreate these rolls, something I’m still in the process of doing. Along the way, I stumbled upon these amazing high rise yeast biscuits. I don’t even want to tell you how many times I’ve made them since…they are so good. Adding yeast to biscuit dough increases the rise, fluffiness and absolute melt-in-your-mouth tenderness of these biscuits. They are the perfect biscuit to serve with Sunday dinner, spread with jam or use with some lunchmeat for a sandwich. I have a few different biscuit recipes on my site that I love for their ease and flakiness, but this one is worth the extra rise time for the tender, melt-in-your-mouth, high rise biscuit.

Jump to High Rise Yeast Biscuits Recipe

Three Rising Agents

A traditional biscuit uses self-rising flour or a lot of baking powder to give it a large oven rise. These high rise yeast biscuits use a combination of rising agents. Instant yeast and an hour rise gives them height and makes them fluffy and delicious. The baking powder and buttermilk react with each other to help create a beautiful rise for the perfect biscuit. One note: I like to use room temperature buttermilk. If you can, pour the buttermilk into a liquid measuring cup before making the biscuits and allow it to come to room temperature. Usually biscuit recipes call for cold butter and cold ingredients to help the biscuits rise in the oven. These biscuits actually benefit from room temperature ingredients (with the exception of the butter) because a warmer environment helps activate the yeast, which gives the biscuits their big rise.

Grated Butter and Shortening

The easiest way to mix up little pieces of butter into dough is to take a cold stick of butter from the refrigerator and grate it. This gives the perfect size pieces of butter for biscuits and is quick and easy, especially if you don’t have a pastry cutter. I also love that the butter pieces are all uniform and combine simply. If you want to substitute the shortening for butter, go ahead. Shortening reduces gluten development or in other words, it shortens the strands of gluten in making biscuits tender and crumbly. Butter, on the other hand, melts in the dough and creates little pockets of steam that lift and puff up the dough. I like including both butter and shortening in my recipe to get a tender, crumbly, flaky biscuit. If you want to just use one over the other, that works. Just beware that you may be sacrificing texture by doing so.

Fold in Half and Top with Butter

I love that these high rise yeast biscuits are rolled out, cut and folded in half before placing in a greased baking dish. The fold gives the biscuits more height and makes them the perfect vehicle for a biscuit sandwich. I think these would be great with some bacon, egg and cheese or even as a nice hearty biscuit to top with some sausage or chocolate gravy. After the biscuits come out of the oven, use a pastry brush to brush them with melted butter. You may think a single coating is enough, but keep coating them until all the butter is used up. The extra butter on top takes these high rise yeast biscuits over the top.

Gluten-Free Option

I made these biscuits gluten-free for my sister who doesn’t eat gluten and she was blown away by how delicious they were. I even sampled some of the gluten-free biscuits and I must say they were delicious. If you want to make these gluten-free, follow the recipe exactly as stated, but substitute in Cup4Cup flour (affiliate link). I’ve found Cup4Cup does a great job in making cookies, muffins, and pancakes gluten-free. If you are looking for a great gluten-free biscuit, these are amazing using gluten-free flour.

Even though these high rise yeast biscuits take a little bit longer than a traditional biscuit recipe, they are worth every hour of that rise time. Still faster than traditional rolls because they only need one rise, you will love having these biscuits at your dinner table! Enjoy!

High Rise Yeast Biscuits

Fluffy, light, buttery and downright delicious. These biscuits have three rising agents, resulting in the most tender biscuit ever. High rise yeast biscuits deserve a special spot at your dinner table.
Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 20 mins
Course Bread, Side Dish
Cuisine American
Servings 24 biscuits

Ingredients
  

  • 1 Tablespoon instant yeast see note
  • 1/4 cup warm water
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 5 cups all purpose flour see note
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 Tablespoon baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 cup vegetable shortening Crisco or similar brand
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter
  • 2 cups buttermilk room temperature
  • 4 Tablespoons unsalted butter, melted for topping biscuits

Instructions
 

  • To a small bowl, add the instant yeast, warm water (temperature of baby's bathwater) and sugar. Set aside while you mix the other ingredients. The yeast will smell yeasty and become bubbly during this time.
  • Add the flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt to a large bowl. Stir together to combine.
  • Cut the shortening into the flour mixture using a pastry cutter (affiliate link), your fingers or two knives. Continue until the shortening is in very small pea-shaped pieces.
  • Using a box grater, grate the cold butter on the edges of the grater. Add the cold butter to the flour mixture. Mix to combine.
  • To the flour/butter mixture, add the reserved yeast and the buttermilk. Mix gently until the dough forms a ball.
  • Turn the dough out on the counter and fold over once or twice, being careful not to overwork the dough.
  • Pat and roll the dough into a large rectangle (roughly 20 inches by 13 inches) and 1/2 inch or more thick. Cut the dough into 20-24 rectangular pieces (depending on how many you want) using a bench knife (affiliate link) or sharp knife.
  • Fold each rectangle in half and place in a greased 9 by 13 baking pan. Continue filling up the pan and nestling the rolls together.
  • Cover with a kitchen towel and let rise about an hour. The time may vary based on the temperature of the buttermilk and the temperature of your kitchen.
  • Once the biscuits have risen (puffed up and approximately doubled in size), preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
  • Bake biscuits for 20 minutes until golden brown on top.
  • As soon as they come out of the oven, brush melted butter on top of the biscuits. Continue brushing until all the butter is used up. Enjoy immediately!

Notes

Dry Active Yeast: This recipe will also work with dry active yeast. Use the same amount of dry active yeast as you would instant yeast. Be sure to let the yeast mixture sit for 5-10 minutes until the yeast has activated with the water and sugar. 
Gluten Free Flour: If you want to make these biscuits gluten-free, you can substitute Cup4Cup flour (affiliate link) for the all purpose flour in the recipe. I do not have experience with any other gluten-free flours. Cup4Cup works very well in this recipe. Substitute the flour and proceed with the recipe as outlined.
 
Keyword biscuit,, fluffy bread

Follow me on Instagram @amybakesbread, like Amy Bakes Bread on Facebook or follow me on Pinterest for more baking ideas.

Please share this recipe if you enjoyed it! Post a photo and tag me @amybakesbread so I can see your bake.

Quick Cream Biscuits

I discovered these quick cream-based biscuits after several rounds of berry picking this summer. We have canned quite a few jars of jam using our favorite Pomona’s Pectin (affiliate link) and my kids were begging for a breakfast of biscuits and jam after helping with all the berry picking. We have been making these biscuits ever since…topping them with jam and freshly whipped cream for a delicious breakfast or a yummy side with your dinner.

Jump Directly to the Recipe for Quick Cream Biscuits

Cream Instead of Butter

Most biscuit recipes I come across use butter (or shortening) as the fat to hold the biscuits together. The pockets of cold butter throughout biscuit dough results in flaky, delicious biscuits (check out my recipe for Southern Biscuits using butter here) so I was a little skeptical when I decided to try biscuits with no butter in them. I didn’t need to worry! The cream takes the place of the butter and adds every bit of richness you would think would be missing. The tablespoon of baking powder and high heat gives these biscuits a nice rise in the oven with flaky layers throughout. I’ve also added in the recipe notes where you can substitute self-rising flour which also gives these biscuits a beautiful rise.

Secret Ingredient: Cornstarch

Cornstarch is one of those secret key ingredients to a lot of recipes. It gives the biscuits a softer texture and makes them melt-in-your-mouth. Combine this biscuit with some freshly made jam and whipped cream and my goodness, they are good. You can also substitute self-rising flour for the flour, baking powder and salt in this recipe with good results.

Breakfast is Served in Twenty Minutes

I love that these biscuits can be made faster than you could whip up a batch of pancakes. Mix together the dry ingredients, add the heavy cream and give it a few good kneads and that’s about it. The oven does the rest of the work for you. My kids are in love with these biscuits and I love them too because they are so quick and easy to make, they could eat them on a school morning. Give them a try, you won’t be disappointed!

Quick Cream Biscuits

Amy
Tender, light and fluffy cream biscuits that are so simple they'll have you coming back for more.
Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 12 mins
Course Bread
Servings 9 depending on how you cut them

Ingredients
  

  • 2 cups all purpose flour *see recipe note for self-rising flour substitute
  • 1/4 cup cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 Tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 Tablespoon granulated sugar plus more for sprinkling on top
  • 1 1/4 cups heavy cream
  • 2 Tablespoons unsalted butter, melted for brushing on top of the biscuits

Instructions
 

  • Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
  • In a bowl, mix together the flour, cornstarch, salt, baking powder, and granulated sugar.
  • Add the heavy cream and mix until just combined.
  • Pour the biscuit mixture out on a lightly floured counter and knead two to three times until the dough comes together.
  • Shape into a thick (about 1- 1 ½ inches thick) square or rectangle and cut out biscuits with a biscuit cutter, bench knife or sharp knife. Cut quickly and don’t turn the biscuit cutter if using or it will not rise as much.
  • Place biscuits on a parchment lined baking sheet.
  • Top with melted butter and a sprinkling of granulated sugar if desired.
  • Bake for 10-12 minutes until a little golden on the edges.
  • Serve hot from the oven with fresh jam and whipped cream. Enjoy!

Notes

Self-rising flour can be substituted in this recipe. Omit baking powder, salt and all purpose flour. Substitute with 2 cups of self-rising flour.
Fill your biscuit with freshly whipped cream and homemade jam thanks to Pomona’s pectin (affiliate link) for a perfect sweet treat.

Follow me on Instagram @amybakesbread, like Amy Bakes Bread on Facebook or follow me on Pinterest for more baking ideas.

Please share this recipe if you enjoyed it! Post a photo and tag me @amybakesbread so I can see your bake 🙂

Simple Oatmeal Biscuit Cookies (Gluten-Free)

Have you ever had breakfast cookies? I’m talking the fat, oatmeal-like cookies filled with apple chunks, chocolate chunks or other delicious mix-ins. These cookies remind me of those breakfast cookies from years past in the delicious oatmeal flavor, though they are a little thinner and crispier in texture. Simple oatmeal biscuit cookies are full of oat flavor, perfect on their own or great for a mix in: mini chocolate chips were a big hit. I also like subbing molasses for the maple syrup for a little kick of flavor. I’m planning to bake up a big batch of these when school starts again for a quick breakfast on the go.

Is it a Cookie or a Biscuit?

Grind up oats in a blender until they form a very fine flour

My family loves watching The Great British Baking Show together and we often notice the different terminology used between bakes in the UK verses what we are used to in the US. These cookies are definitely err on the side of a British biscuit which tends to be a little crunchier version of an American cookie, perfect with a cup of tea. Oatmeal Biscuit Cookies are an American version of an English oat biscuit…hence the name: Oatmeal Biscuit Cookie. Whatever you call them, they’re delicious and made with 100% oats…no wheat flour in sight. 

A Few Tips

I prefer this cookie slightly under-baked which gives a little bit softer cookie. The cookie will be a little more crumbly, which is the nature of a 100% oat cookie. It is also delicious with crispy edges and may hold together a little better. Letting the cookie cool completely before eating helps with the crumbs too. 

Gluten-Free, 100% oat cookie

I don’t bake gluten-free all that often, but I do enjoy cooking up some gluten-free treats for my sister whenever we get together. My sister loved these cookies so much when I made them that we even made them twice while we were together. If you are gluten-free and making these cookies, make sure you use gluten-free oats. Some oats can have trace gluten in them depending on where they were processed. The word on the street is that they make amazing cookies to sandwich between a toasted marshmallow and chocolate…bring on the summer Smores!

Very Versatile Cookie

These cookies are a great base for a variety of mix-ins. If you want a breakfast type cookie that would be perfect for kids on their way to school in the mornings, add in some diced, dried fruit. I think currants or cut up Craisins would be delicious. If you are looking for a sweet treat, try adding some mini chocolate chips or drizzling dark chocolate on top. I would even add a little schmear of peanut butter and jam on these as an after-school snack. These cookies would also make a perfect gluten-free pie crust to crumble instead of graham crackers or Oreos. 

Simple Oatmeal Biscuit Cookies

Yield: 20-24 cookies

Time: 10-15 minute mix, 10 minute bake

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups rolled oats (makes 3 cups oat flour, blended)
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 12 Tablespoons cold unsalted butter
  • 3 Tablespoons almond milk (milk or water can be substituted)
  • 1 teaspoon maple syrup (you can substitute molasses or honey as well for a different flavor)
  • ½ cup mini chocolate chips, currants, diced up fruit (if desired)

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Dump oats into a blender or food processor and process until very fine. 
  3. Add oats, brown sugar, salt, cinnamon and baking soda. Mix together in a bowl or in a food processor.
  4. Cut the butter into small cubes. Using a pastry cutter or a food processor, cut the butter into the oat flour mixture until crumbly and fine. Alternatively you could also grate the cold butter into the flour mixture like this strawberry shortcake recipe.
  5. Add the almond milk and maple syrup. Mix together until a dough forms. Add mini chocolate chips if desired.
  6. Roll about 1 tablespoon of dough into a ball and place on a parchment lined baking sheet. Continue until all the dough has been made into cookie balls. Cookies fit about 12 to a baking sheet.
  7. Lightly wet the bottom of a glass (or your hand), and press down on the top of each of the cookie balls so they are lightly flattened.
  8. Bake 10-12 minutes, rotating the pan at the 5-6 minute mark.  
  9. Let cookies cool completely before drizzling with chocolate, sandwiching with jam or topping with a toasted marshmallow and chocolate. Of course they are delicious plain too! Enjoy!

Follow me on Instagram @amybakesbread, like Amy Bakes Bread on Facebook or follow me on Pinterest for more baking ideas.

Please share this recipe if you enjoyed it! Post a photo and tag me @amybakesbread so I can see your bake 🙂

Sourdough Cheddar Biscuits

This recipe is specifically written to use sourdough discard. I keep discard in my fridge specifically for discard recipes.

Quick, easy, melt-in-your-mouth and only takes 25 minutes? Sign me up please! I like to serve these biscuits in place of a dinner roll, or we dunk them in soup or serve with a salad. Sometimes you just need a little something extra to go with dinner and these are my new go-to, savory dinner biscuits.

Sharp, cheesy, flavor In these savory biscuits

Sharp cheddar cheese provides the cheesy flavor in these biscuits. Use a good quality sharp cheddar that you already love. If you have another type of sharp cheese you want to try here, you can do that too. I have found that cheese will often mellow in flavor when you bake with it, so I like to use a sharp flavor to start which will translate into the perfect cheesy flavor in the biscuits. The cold sourdough discard gives these biscuits a little tang that marries so well with the cheese flavor. I think cheese and sourdough are just meant to go together. Check out these crispy discard crackers that marry that same cheese and sourdough flavor if you love the combination.

How do these biscuits get their rise?

The combination of the baking powder and cold sourdough discard give these biscuits a beautiful rise in the oven. The heavy cream and light hand when mixing results in a tender and fluffy biscuit. What more could you ask for in a quick addition to the dinner table? 

Grate the cheese and then mix it in with the dry ingredients before adding the cold sourdough discard and the heavy cream. I find it easier to use a light hand when mixing if I’ve already added in the cheese and it makes the cheese more evenly dispersed throughout the biscuits. 

Shape the biscuits into a circle before cutting like a pizza

Shape the sourdough cheddar biscuits into one large circle and cut them into slices with a bench scraper (affiliate link), as you would cut a pizza or a pie. Keep the dough about an inch to an inch and a half thick and pat into a circle. Using the bench scraper, make one swift move to cut the biscuit for a better rise. These biscuits are a little dangerous because you can have them on your table in just about 20 minutes and they taste amazing straight from the oven.

These sourdough cheddar biscuits are gobbled up by my family every time I make them with everyone begging for seconds. Somehow they always seem to be the star of the show…no matter how much time I’ve spent on the rest of the meal. We like to eat them plain, with a little butter or even jam (is that weird?!). I hope you love them too!

Sourdough Cheddar Biscuits

Yield: 8 biscuits

Time: 10 minute mix, 13 minute bake

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup (5 oz) all purpose flour
  • 1 Tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 overflowing cup (about 4.5 oz) shredded sharp cheddar cheese
  • 1 cup (about 9 oz) sourdough discard 
  • ½ cup (5 oz) heavy cream 

Directions:

  1. Preheat your oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. In a bowl, mix together flour, baking powder and salt. 
  3. Shred a little over 1 cup of sharp cheddar cheese and add to the flour mixture. I always shred my own cheese because I think it has a better flavor and texture but you could use pre-shredded cheese too.
  4. Add 1 cup of cold sourdough discard and ½ cup of heavy cream. Gently mix to combine. If the biscuits are too crumbly to hold together, add a little more cream.
  5. Flour your counter and gently dump biscuit dough on the counter. Knead once or twice, being careful not to overwork the dough. Form into a circle about an inch to an inch and a half thick.
  6. Using a bench knife (affiliate link) or a sharp knife, cut the biscuits into eight wedges.
  7. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and set each biscuit on the paper spread a little bit apart.
  8. Bake for 13 minutes at 425 degrees until lightly browned and baked through. Enjoy!

Follow me on Instagram @amybakesbread, like Amy Bakes Bread on Facebook or follow me on Pinterest for more baking ideas.

Please share this recipe if you enjoyed it! Post a photo and tag me @amybakesbread so I can see your bake 🙂

High Rise Yeast Biscuits
Fluffy, light, buttery and downright delicious. These biscuits have three rising agents …
All About: Vital Wheat Gluten (And why It deserves a Place in Your PANTRY)
All about Vital Wheat Gluten, the way it helps you achieve a …
One Year
One Year of amybakesbread.com! It's been one year of recipes, writing, learning …
King Cake Scones
Quick, fun and super delicious. These King Cake Scones, sandwiched with cinnamon, …

Irish Soda Bread

I am a “tradition” kind of mom. I don’t think it needs to take a lot of work or brain power to make holidays fun for our family. Just putting out a few decorative plates or making a unique recipe from ingredients I already have on hand is enough. It’s amazing how the little things can form into new family traditions! This Irish Soda Bread is a quick, easy way to bring a little fun to the month of March or to enjoy with a hearty soup year round.

Jump to Irish Soda Bread Recipe

St. Patrick’s Day Traditions

St. Patrick’s Day has always been a day of fun in our house. The weekend before my kids create “houses” for the leprechaun to visit when he comes to our house. I know some families make leprechaun traps which are also a fun idea. We use recycled boxes (thank you amazon prime), all the green construction paper from our craft closet and our imaginations. The night before St. Patrick’s Day they pull out their little houses and set them up around our house. The leprechaun “magically” pays a visit that night leaving little green footprints and a trail to follow which leads to a pot of gold (coins) at the end of the trail. 

St. Patrick’s Day Meal

Other ways we make this somewhat ordinary day special are by wearing green, checking out books from the library on leprechauns and Ireland and eating something green or Irish for dinner. This varies from year to year but we always try to make our dinner something special. I often make this Irish Soda Bread. Paired with a hearty stew, corned beef and cabbage or even some baked potatoes and roasted veggies this would make a great addition to your St. Patrick’s Day meal. By the middle of March, we are all looking for fun things to celebrate as we are coming out of the winter months.

History Behind Irish Soda Bread

Irish Soda Bread was adopted in the 1800s after the potato famine. It was inexpensive, with only a few ingredients and easy to make. Originally the bread contained nothing more than flour, buttermilk, baking soda and salt. Over the years, recipes have been changed to increase the flavor and taste but the leavening agent remains the same: baking soda. Some areas of Ireland would cut a cross in the top of the bread to ward off evil and protect their families. The texture and flavor of Irish Soda Bread reminds me of a giant biscuit with a hard crust. It is a crowd-pleaser, quick to make and fun to eat. I hope you’ll give it a try!

Irish Soda Bread

A giant loaf of biscuit-like bread, studded with currants and flavored with some orange zest. This is the perfect bread to celebrate St. Patrick's Day, serve with soup or enjoy as a snack.
Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 50 mins
Course Bread, Side Dish
Cuisine Irish
Servings 1 loaf

Ingredients
  

  • 1 3/4 cup buttermilk see recipe notes
  • 4 Tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 4 cups all purpose flour
  • 5 Tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 cup currants or raisins optional

Instructions
 

  • Preheat your oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside.
  • In a small bowl whisk together the buttermilk and egg. Set aside.
  • Mix the flour, sugar, baking soda and salt together in a bowl and lightly mix together. Add the currants and orange zest if using and lightly coat with the flour mixture.
  • Grate the cold butter directly into the mixture or cut the butter into small chunks or use a pastry cutter until the butter is finely incorporated. There should be no big lumps of butter, just small pea-sized pieces.
  • Pour the buttermilk mixture into the flour mixture and stir to lightly incorporate. If the dough is a little sticky, add a little extra flour. Turn the dough out onto the counter and knead once or twice. This is a quick bread, so you don’t want to activate the gluten in the flour with a lot of kneading. Shape into a round circle.
  • Transfer the loaf to the baking pan and score a large X on the top. Bake for 20 minutes and then check the top of your bread. If it is browning quickly, cover the top with a sheet of aluminum foil to prevent burning. Bake until the bread is cooked through, about 45-50 minutes. 
  • Allow bread to cool 15 minutes and then serve warm. It can also be eaten at room temperature or toasted for a snack later. Enjoy!

Notes

Buttermilk: I always pick up buttermilk at the store to use in my baking. I think it is superior to most substitutions. With that said, the best substitutions I have found for one cup of buttermilk are:
  • a mixture of ½ cup plain yogurt (or sour cream) and ½ cup milk mixed together (per cup of buttermilk)
  • 1 Tablespoon vinegar replaces 1 Tablespoon whole milk in a cup, let it sit for 5 minutes before using
  • 1 Tablespoon lemon juice replaces 1 Tablespoon whole milk in a cup, let it sit for 5 minutes before using
Keyword biscuit,, Irish Soad Bread, St. Patrick’s Day

Please share this recipe if you enjoyed it! Post a photo and tag me @amybakesbread so I can see your bake 🙂

Follow me on Instagram @amybakesbread or like Amy Bakes Bread on Facebook for more baking ideas.