sourdough mashed potato rolls

Sourdough Mashed Potato Rolls

Are you ready for this?! A seriously amazing roll recipe that is perfect for those leftover mashed potatoes that seem to be hanging around in the refrigerator after the holidays. Leftover mashed potato gives these rolls the best texture: soft, fluffy and so tender! Sourdough mashed potato rolls also hold up longer than regular dinner rolls because the potato actually keeps them fresher longer. And with all that leftover turkey or ham from the holidays, these rolls would make perfect sandwiches. I’ve made them twice this past week and they have been gobbled up each time. They are just SO GOOD!

Leftover Mashed Potatoes in Bread Dough

Adding cooked/mashed potato to bread makes for a super soft dough. A few years ago I posted a recipe for this delicious fluffy potato bread where I wrote about the benefits of adding potato to dough. One of the big benefits: a super soft dough and resulting bread. Often your mashed potatoes will have added butter, salt and maybe even sour cream or cream cheese in them — that’s okay. Just be prepared that you may need to add a little more or less flour to the dough. Oftentimes when I make this recipe, I’m using mashed potatoes out of my refrigerator. I like to warm up the mashed potatoes to room temperature so that they aren’t bringing down the temperature of the dough (longer rise needed at a colder temperature). If you don’t have leftover mashed potatoes and still want to make these amazing rolls, don’t worry! You can. Mash up the insides of a baked potato or you can even microwave a potato as outlined in this post.

Sourdough Discard in Leftover Mashed Potato Rolls

As someone who actively tries to use up every little bit of everything in my refrigerator, this recipe speaks to me. Leftover mashed potatoes and leftover sourdough discard together: win-win! This recipe uses about 1 cup of sourdough discard. Discard that has been sitting in the refrigerator for a week or longer will give a more “sour” flavor to these rolls. Discard that is bubbly and fresh will not add as much flavor to the rolls. Make sure that the discard you are using is 100% hydration. If it’s not, you’ll need to add a little more or less water to this recipe. You can also make this recipe using bubbly sourdough starter (100% hydration) and omit the instant yeast. Your risings will take much longer, but this recipe is easily adaptable to natural yeast.

Knead the Dough

To the bowl of a stand mixer, mix together the mashed potatoes, sourdough discard, warm water, sugar and instant yeast. Let the mixture sit for a minute until it smells yeasty and you can tell your instant yeast is working. Then add the melted butter, eggs, salt and bread flour. You may need to add a little more or less flour depending on how much liquid is in your mashed potatoes. Go by the feel of the dough. As you knead the dough, check if the dough is all going to one side or pulling away from the sides of the bowl. Can you pinch off a piece of dough, roll it up into a little ball easily with just a little bit of sticky residue on your fingers? Does the dough feel tacky and not overly sticky? If you can answer these questions with a yes, your dough probably doesn’t need anymore flour. Continue kneading for about 8 minutes or about 10-15 minutes by hand, adding flour a Tablespoon at a time as necessary. Once the dough is kneaded, cover it and let rise for 1-2 hours.

Shaping Rolls

After the first rise, it’s time to shape your rolls. If you like pull-apart style rolls (like the picture), you will want to nestle your rolls together in a baking dish. I like using glass pans for rolls, but a metal pan should work too. Alternatively you can place parchment paper on a baking sheet and place the rolls on a baking sheet for non-pull-apart style. Separate the roll dough into 24 equal pieces. Take each piece of dough and pull/pinch up the sides until it forms a ball. Roll the ball on the counter using your hand in a cupping shape (see video here) to seal the balls and create tension. Place in a pan and repeat with the other rolls.

Rolls Rising

Cover the rolls and let rise for another hour or two until puffy, touching (if your rolls are nestled together) and almost doubled in size. To make sure the rolls are ready, take a finger and press into one of the rolls. If the roll springs back immediately with no indentation left, the rolls need more time to rise. If the indentation springs back just a little, it’s time to bake. If you press in and the indentation stays there with no spring–you may want to re-shape the rolls and let them rise again (they have risen too much).

Bake and Enjoy

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and bake the rolls in a preheated oven for 22-25 minutes until starting to brown on top and baked all the way through. Top with melted butter when they come out of the oven for a beautiful shine. Let cool a bit before slicing and enjoying with leftover turkey, butter & jam or plain. I think they would be incredible with a little cranberry sauce, turkey, spinach and brie or any other favorite “leftover” combination. These soft and tender sourdough mashed potato rolls will be a post-Thanksgiving highlight for sure!

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I store leftover sourdough mashed potato rolls?

Once the rolls cool, place in an airtight container or ziplock bag for up to 24 hours at room temperature. After 24 hours, freeze for up to 3 months.

Can I use garlic or herb flavored mashed potatoes in these rolls?

I think this would make a great savory addition to the rolls. Try it and let me know in the comments!

I want to make these rolls without instant yeast? Can I use sourdough starter instead of yeast?

You can make this recipe using bubbly sourdough starter, 100% hydration and omit the instant yeast. Your risings will take much longer, but this recipe is easily adaptable to natural yeast.

I want larger rolls. Can I make 16 instead of 24 rolls?

Yes. This recipe can make 16 rolls instead of 24. Your bake time will be a little bit longer with larger rolls, so adjust accordingly.

sourdough mashed potato rolls

Sourdough Mashed Potato Rolls

Amy
Looking for something to make with leftover mashed potatoes? Sourdough mashed potato rolls are so soft, fluffy and delicious thanks to the addition of leftover mashed potatoes and sourdough discard. Make these for your family and they will be gobbled up in no time!
Prep Time 30 mins
Cook Time 25 mins
Rise Time 2 hrs
Course Bread, rolls, Side Dish, Snack
Cuisine American
Servings 24 rolls

Ingredients
  

  • 213 grams room temperature mashed potatoes about 1 cup, see recipe notes
  • 200 grams sourdough discard or bubbly sourdough starter, see recipe notes, about 1 cup
  • 113 grams warm water about 1/2 cup
  • 67 grams granulated sugar about 1/3 cup
  • 10 grams instant yeast about 1 Tablespoon, see recipe notes
  • 109 grams melted unsalted butter 8 Tablespoons or 1 stick
  • 2 large eggs about 100 grams
  • 16 grams salt about 2 teaspoons
  • 750 grams bread flour about 6 cups

Instructions
 

  • To the bowl of a stand mixer add the room temperature mashed potato, sourdough discard, warm water, granulated sugar, instant yeast, melted butter, eggs and salt. Add most of the flour, reserving about a cup to add as needed. Mix until completely combined and add the rest of the flour a little bit at a time until the dough is tacky (not super sticky) and pulls away from the sides of the bowl. If the dough is overly sticky, add a little more flour. Depending on how hydrated your mashed potatoes are, you may need more or less flour.
  • Mix the dough for 8-10 minutes until smooth. Alternatively you can knead the dough by hand for 10-15 minutes.
  • Lightly grease a 9 by 13 inch pan and an 8 by 8 pan. Alternatively you could line a large baking sheet with parchment paper and place dough balls on the baking sheet. 
  • Once the dough has risen, cut and separate into 24 pieces. Take each piece of dough and pull/pinch up the sides until it forms a ball. Roll the ball on the counter using your hand in a cupping shape (see video here) to seal the balls and create tension for the roll to rise. Nestle together in the pan or on the baking sheet. Cover and let rise until puffy, touching and almost doubled in size.
  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Once the oven is pre-heated, bake the rolls for about 22-25 minutes until starting to brown on top and baked all the way through. Spread some melted butter on top of the warm rolls if desired and enjoy!

Notes

Mashed Potatoes: I make this recipe whenever I have leftover mashed potatoes. If you don’t have leftovers to add into the recipe, you can use the inside of a baked potato. Bake one or two potatoes. Let them cool. Slice and mash up the inside of the potato. Use in the recipe in place of mashed potatoes. If using mashed potatoes from the refrigerator, warm them up just a bit so they aren’t super cold when adding to the dough.
Sourdough Discard: This recipe uses about 1 cup of 100% hydration sourdough discard. Discard that has been sitting in the refrigerator for a week or longer will give a more “sour” flavor to these rolls. Discard that is bubbly and fresh will not add as much flavor to the rolls. You can also make this recipe using bubbly sourdough starter, 100% hydration and omit the instant yeast. Your risings will take much longer, but this recipe is easily adaptable to natural yeast.
Instant Yeast: I like baking with SAF instant yeast. You can also look for bread machine or fast rising yeast at the grocery store. If you’d like to use dry active yeast, add the warm water, sugar and dry active yeast to the mixture before anything else. Let it sit for about 5-10 minutes until bubbly and active before adding the rest of the ingredients.
Keyword fluffy sourdough bread, homemade rolls, leftover mashed potatoes, leftovers, mashed potato rolls, soft sourdough rolls, sourdough discard, sourdough discard recipe, sourdough discard rolls, sourdough recipe, sourdough rolls, Thanksgiving leftovers

Rating: 1 out of 5.

Disclaimer: I am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed for me to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com. As an Amazon Associate, I earn a very small amount from qualifying purchases.

Follow me on Instagram @amybakesbread, like Amy Bakes Bread on Facebook or follow me on Pinterest for more baking ideas. Please share this recipe if you enjoyed it! Post a photo and tag me @amybakesbread so I can see your bake.

4 responses to “Sourdough Mashed Potato Rolls”

  1. Kris Avatar
    Kris

    Bring on these rolls! Beautiful and delicious! 🥔 🍞 😍😋

  2. Lee Avatar
    Lee

    When I have a potato or two sitting around and I know I won’t use them soon, I cook them, mash them, and freeze them in 1/4 cup sizes. That works great for bread. I also freeze the unsalted potato water for the same reason

    1. Amy Avatar

      These are great tips! Thanks for sharing.

  3. […] Sourdough Mashed Potato Rolls — Amy Bakes Bread […]

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No Knead Sourdough Crescent Rolls

Rolls are one of my favorite, easy ways to make a dinner go from good to memorable. If you’re looking for the perfect little roll to go with Thanksgiving dinner, a weekend meal or something fun for a weeknight, these no knead sourdough crescent rolls are amazing. Buttery, super soft and just delicious: they will be the star of your night. No knead sourdough crescent rolls are made with 100% sourdough — no instant yeast — and are the easiest, most delicious little rolls, rolled in a crescent roll style.

For more favorite roll recipes check out: Sourdough Discard Soft White Rolls, Easy White Dinner Rolls, Parmesan Herb Rolls, One-Hour Yeast Rolls, or these Cloverleaf Dinner Rolls.

Sample Sourdough Schedule

Day 1
3:30 PM – 7:30 PMMix leaven, let rise until bubbly and active about 3-4 hours
8:00 PMMix Dough, cover and refrigerate at least 12 hours or up to 3 days
Day 2
8:00 AMSeparate, shape and roll crescent rolls. Let rise about 4-6 hours until puffy
12:00-2:00 PM Bake rolls

Mix Leaven

For this sourdough crescent roll recipe, I make a leaven that is 1:1:1 (equal parts starter/flour/water). This leaven will bubble and double in size in about 3-4 hours if it’s an active starter and kept at the right temperature, right around 75 degrees. You can also mix the leaven overnight at a 1:5:5 ratio (20 grams starter/100 grams flour/100 grams water) and let it ferment longer before using. All that to say, making the leaven is very adaptable to your schedule. You want to end up with 200 grams of bubbly, active leaven that has doubled or tripled in size. I mix my leaven in a liquid measuring cup, cover it with plastic wrap and then watch until it’s ready to use. The liquid measuring cup makes it easy to read and know when my leaven has doubled in size. Alternatively you can just mark your jar and eyeball it. Once the leaven has fermented, it is ready to use in the recipe. If you prefer to make these rolls with sourdough discard instead of bubbly/active sourdough, you can add 1 Tablespoon (10 grams) of instant yeast to the roll dough and follow the recipe as written. After shaping the rolls, they will only need an hour or two to rise before being baked.

Mix the Dough

Sourdough crescent rolls are SO easy to make. “No-knead” takes a lot of the guesswork out of them. Whisk together the bubbly leaven, evaporated milk, water, egg, melted butter, sugar, salt and 140 grams of the flour. When it’s all whisked/mixed together it will look like a wet batter. I love saving myself some dishes, so you can do this next part right in the same bowl–or if you don’t mind washing an extra bowl, pull out a new one. Right on top of the wet batter, add the flour, but DON’T MIX. Grate the cold butter on top of the flour and using your hands, gently mix the cold butter into the flour until it’s fairly evenly dispersed. Try not to mix the flour into the batter that’s underneath during this part (remember you can do this in a separate bowl if it makes you nervous, but I’m all about one-bowl recipes). After the butter is evenly distributed in the flour, use a kitchen spoon and mix all the ingredients in the bowl together. Your dough should have little chunks of grated butter in it. Those are good and when melted eventually will form flaky pockets of delicious crescent roll. This mixing will form a ball of dough. Cover the dough and stick it in your refrigerator for 12 hours or up to 3 days.

Long Refrigeration

A long, typically overnight refrigeration, is not only good for your time management (these no-knead sourdough crescent rolls are SO easy!) but that overnight refrigeration is where all the magic happens:

  • Enzymes break down the long protein strands of gluten in the dough, eliminating the need for a typical “kneading.”
  • Increased amount of time in the refrigerator improves the bread’s flavor.

After 12 hours, or up to 3 days, it’s time to take the dough out of the refrigerator and start shaping your crescent rolls.

Shaping Sourdough Crescent Rolls

Sourdough crescent rolls are shaped the same way you would a regular crescent roll.

  1. Prepare two large baking sheets with parchment paper. Separate dough into 4 equal pieces.
  2. Lightly flour a surface and roll one piece of dough out about 10-11 inches round. I like to use a pastry mat for easier rolling. Turn the dough 30-45 degrees like you would for pie crust to get a circle shape.
  3. Spread melted butter on the circle of dough. Use a pizza cutter to slice the dough into 8 pieces.
  4. Starting with the edge, roll the dough up to the center in a crescent roll shape and place the roll on the baking sheet. Repeat with the other balls of dough until you have 32 rolls.

Long Sourdough Rise

Sourdough takes much longer to rise than rolls made with instant yeast. Plan for at least 5-6 hours for these rolls to rise in around a 75-78 degree environment. Cover the rolls and let them sit. Don’t bake the rolls until they have puffed up and it has been at least 5-6 hours. If your room temperature is warmer than 75-78 degrees, they may be ready at around 4 hours but they may also “leak” some butter which will impact the flakiness of your rolls, so it’s important to try for that 75-78 degree temperature. If your room is much colder, the rolls will take even longer to rise. Moral of the story: let them rise for a long time and make sure you notice a change in the rolls–puffy/larger/could be doubled in size.

Baking Sourdough Crescent Rolls

Baking sourdough crescent rolls is straightforward and easy! Preheat your oven to 350 degrees and once the oven preheats, pop them in the oven for 12-15 minutes. Pull them out and spread some melted butter over the top of the rolls. Serve immediately! These rolls are so delicious warm out of the oven and make the best little side for a weekend dinner or Thanksgiving meal. We love these rolls anytime, but especially for those special occasion meals. They are the perfect size that I don’t even mind when the kids grab two…or three.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I substitute milk for evaporated milk?

This recipe has been tested using evaporated milk. If you’d like to substitute milk, I recommend scalding or boiling whole milk (or 1%-2%) and letting it reduce by about half. Let it cool before using in the recipe.

How do I store leftover sourdough crescent rolls?

Store leftovers in a ziplock bag at room temperature for 24 hours. Then freeze the leftovers for up to 3 months. To eat (even from room temperature), re-heat for just a few seconds in the microwave–they are delicious warm!

My sourdough crescent rolls didn’t rise. Help!

If your rolls didn’t rise when baking, you may not have let them proof long enough at room temperature. The rolls should be left for 5-6 hours to rise. Check the temperature where they were left to rise. Was it too cold? Cold temperatures are not very friendly to yeast growing/producing a rise. You may need to warm up your environment for your rolls to rise. Also check that your sourdough starter is active, doubling in size and very bubbly before using it. Sometimes a sourdough starter needs a few feeds before becoming active if it’s been sitting in the refrigerator for awhile. Consistent feeding will give you better results.

The point of my crescent roll keeps popping up when baking. How do I fix that?

Sometimes that will happen with these rolls. To help, I make sure to place the point side down on the baking sheet so it’s underneath the roll. This works most of the time, but sometimes you’ll have a few that pop. That’s okay! It’s just part of working with yeast bread…they still taste delicious!

No Knead Sourdough Crescent rolls

No Knead Sourdough Crescent Rolls

Buttery, no-knead, crescent rolls made with 100% active sourdough–no instant yeast! These are the easiest and most delicious little rolls that are perfect for a special meal or weekend dinner.
Prep Time 25 mins
Cook Time 15 mins
Rise Time 18 hrs
Course Bread, rolls, Side Dish, Snack
Cuisine American
Servings 32 rolls

Ingredients
  

Leaven

  • 75 grams sourdough starter
  • 75 grams water
  • 75 grams flour

No Knead Sourdough Crescent Rolls

  • 200 grams leaven 3/4 cup, see recipe notes
  • 190 grams evaporated milk 3/4 cup, see recipe notes
  • 140 grams warm water a little less than 2/3 cup
  • 1 large egg about 50 grams
  • 71 grams granulated sugar about 1/3 cup
  • 16 grams salt about 2 teaspoons
  • 60 grams melted unsalted butter about 1/4 cup
  • 710 grams all purpose flour (140 grams plus 570 grams separated) 5 cups (1 cup plus 4 cups separated)
  • 113 grams unsalted butter, chilled and grated 1/2 cup
  • 60 grams melted butter reserved for shaping rolls about 1/4 cup

Instructions
 

  • Day 1

Leaven

  • About 4 hours before mixing the roll dough, make the leaven. Mix together 75 grams of ripe sourdough starter with 75 grams room temperature water and 75 grams flour. Stir together, mark your jar so you can watch the leaven double in size and put it in a warm (75 degree) place to ferment.
  • Once the leaven has doubled in size and is bubbly, active and starting to round at the top (this should take about 3-4 hours), you are ready to mix the roll dough.

No Knead Sourdough Crescent Rolls

  • To a bowl, mix together the leaven, evaporated milk, water, egg, sugar, salt, melted butter and 140 grams of the flour. Whisk together until completely combined.
  • Add the rest of the flour on top of the liquid mixture but DON'T MIX (alternatively you can do this in a separate bowl but I don't like washing dishes). Grate the cold butter on top of the flour and use your hands to mix it in with the flour on top of the liquid mixture. If a little liquid gets into the flour, don't worry, just continue spreading it throughout the flour as best you can. Once the butter chunks are evenly spread throughout the flour, use a spoon to mix the flour/butter mixture in with the liquid at the bottom of the bowl. Mix until you form a ball of dough.
  • Cover the bowl and place it in the refrigerator overnight. This dough can be left in the refrigerator for up to 3 days to ferment before rolling out and shaping. It needs to sit in the refrigerator for a minimum of 8 hours.

Day 2

  • Pull the dough out of the refrigerator. Separate the dough into 4 pieces and roll each piece out into a 10 inch circle. Spread melted butter over each circle and then slice each circle into 8 pieces with a pizza cutter. Starting at the edge, tightly roll each piece of dough all the way in until you have a crescent roll shape. Repeat with the other 7 rolls.
  • Place each roll on a parchment lined baking sheet. Repeat with the other 3 pieces of dough, rolling them into circles, spreading melted butter and then rolling up each roll. You should have a total of 32 rolls or about 16 rolls per baking sheet.
  • Cover the rolls and set them in a warm place (about 75 degrees) to rise. This rise should take about 5-6 hours depending on the temperature. Once the rolls have puffed up a bit and it has been over 5 hours (in the winter you'll most likely need closer to 6 or 7 hours), preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  • Bake crescent rolls for about 12-15 minutes until baked through. Brush with melted butter as they come out of the oven. Enjoy warm!

Notes

Leaven: If you prefer to make these rolls with sourdough discard, you can add 1 Tablespoon (10 grams) of instant yeast to the roll dough and follow the recipe as written. After shaping the rolls, they will only need an hour or two to rise before being baked.
Evaporated Milk: This recipe has been tested using evaporated milk. If you’d like to substitute milk, I recommend scalding or boiling whole milk (or 1%-2%) and letting it reduce by about half. Then let it cool before using in the recipe.
Keyword beginner sourdough, crescent rolls, Dinner Rolls, homemade rolls, roll up rolls, soft sourdough rolls, sourdough crescent rolls, sourdough recipe, sourdough rolls

Rating: 1 out of 5.

Disclaimer: I am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed for me to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com. As an Amazon Associate, I earn a very small amount from qualifying purchases.

Follow me on Instagram @amybakesbread, like Amy Bakes Bread on Facebook or follow me on Pinterest for more baking ideas. Please share this recipe if you enjoyed it! Post a photo and tag me @amybakesbread so I can see your bake.

One response to “No Knead Sourdough Crescent Rolls”

  1. Kris Avatar
    Kris

    Deliciousness! Looking forward to these this week! 🥐🥐🥐😍😋🦃

Leave a Reply

Cranberry Apple Pie (Sourdough Pie Crust)

If I could choose any pie to bring to Thanksgiving, Friendsgiving, Pi Night or whenever I see cranberries in season at my local grocery store, this is it! Fresh cranberry apple pie with an amazing flaky sourdough pie crust is delicious. The cranberries add a little tartness to the sweet apples, and that hint of almond extract keeps me coming back for more. It is truly a slice of heaven and will be a standout pie at your next gathering. I hope you enjoy this fresh cranberry apple pie as much as we do!

Sourdough Discard in Pie Crust

This pie could be made with a store-bought or homemade pie crust but I love this sourdough version that gives just a little bit more flavor. Chilled sourdough discard gives this pie crust more flavor, which pairs so well with this cranberry apple pie. If you prefer a stronger sourdough flavor, use sourdough discard that has been sitting longer in the refrigerator. For a more mild crust, use bubbly sourdough starter (chilled) or discard that is only a day or two old. It is also important for the sourdough discard to be 100% hydration with equal parts flour and water. If you use sourdough discard that is not 100% hydration, you’ll want to add ice water or more flour depending on how thick your sourdough starter is. I’ve written up an entire recipe post devoted to sourdough pie crust. Find all the details here.

Mixing the Pie Dough

My sourdough pie crust has a unique way of being mixed. Mix together half of the flour (including sugar/salt) and butter together, coating the butter in the flour, effectively locking the fats and discouraging gluten development when the water from the sourdough discard is mixed with the pastry. Add the rest of the flour and mix until the dough resembles crumbs. Then mix in the sourdough discard and any extra ice water that may be needed until the dough forms large clumps and can stick together. Separate into two balls of dough and flatten into discs. Refrigerate for 20 minutes until rolling out for the pie.

Cranberry Apple Pie Filling

Honeycrisp or Granny Smith apples make this pie truly delicious, though you can use any of your favorite baking apples. Peel and core the apples using an apple peeler or a hand peeler. Using an apple peeler to make an apple pie is a game changer! Slice apples into chunks and place in a large mixing bowl. Add the fresh cranberries, sugar, flour, salt, cinnamon, almond extract and lemon juice. The almond extract is one of my favorite additions to this pie. I will sometimes increase the almond extract to 2 teaspoons just because I love the flavor so much. It adds a uniqueness that really makes this pie standout. Mix together the filling and set it aside while you roll out the pie dough.

Chilling and Rolling the Sourdough Pie Dough

Once the pie dough has been mixed and separated into two discs, it’s important to chill the dough before rolling it out. This chilling process helps relax the gluten in the dough (remember, less gluten development means tender, flaky pie dough) and solidifies the butter. Once the dough has been chilled for about 20 minutes, very lightly flour a pastry mat and roll the dough out, turning it about 30-45 degrees at a time until you have a nice round circle of pie dough. Fold the dough into quarters and then place the dough into the pie dish. Repeat the process for rolling out the top crust, making the pie dough just a little bit bigger to fit over the mounded filling. Place some pats of butter on top of the pie filling and then spread the top crust over the pie filling.

A Whole Lot of Pie Filling

Don’t skimp on the amount of filling to put in this fresh cranberry apple pie. Mound the filling up high in the middle fo the pie plate. The apples and cranberries will all cook down as the pie bakes. When the pie cools, the real magic happens when the cooked apples, cranberries and sugar gel together to make a delicious pie filling.

Crimping the Edges

Decorate the pie however you would like to. I like to crimp the edges of the pie, sealing in all the juices as they bubble in the oven. To do this, I use kitchen scissors to cut the pie dough around the edges and then take the top layer of pie crust and fold it under the bottom edge of crust. This seals the pie shut. At that point I crimp the edges using my knuckles and one finger to decorate around the pie. I like to egg wash the pastry before baking. Whisk together an egg with a splash of water and use a pastry brush to brush the egg wash on top of the pie. Sprinkle about a Tablespoon of sugar over the pie for a beautiful finish.

Baking the Pie

Cranberry apple pie bakes for a long time. It is necessary for the apples and cranberries to bake down and gel with the sugar in the pie to form the pie filling. Place a rack in the middle of the oven, closer to the bottom than the top. Place a baking sheet on the lower rack of the oven to catch any of the juices that will bubble over. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees and bake the pie for 90 minutes. After about 45 minutes, check on your pie and see how the pastry is browning. If it is browning too quickly, place a few pieces of aluminum foil over the edges of the pie crust. You could also use a pie shield.

The Most Difficult Part: Letting the Pie Cool

Once the pie is bubbling, you are ready for the most difficult part: letting the pie cool! If you plan to bake this pie for Thanksgiving, make it the night before or the morning of so it has time to properly cool. All of the fruit and sugar needs to gel together to make a perfectly delicious pie filling. Allowing the pie proper time to cool is a big part of the process. Once the pie has cooled you can slice it and heat individual slices, if desired, or serve with a scoop of vanilla ice cream. I hope you enjoy my very favorite Thanksgiving pie of all time. Let me know how you liked it in the comments below!

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I make this pie without the sourdough crust?

You can use any favorite crust recipe for this pie. I love this sourdough discard pie crust but even a store-bought crust will work.

Could I use dried cranberries instead of fresh cranberries in this pie?

I wouldn’t recommend it. I love the freshness of whole cranberries in this pie. They add a tart burst of flavor that works beautifully with the apples.

Why should I let the pie cool completely before eating?

While the pie cools, the cooked apples & cranberries gel with the sugar to form a delicious pie filling. If you cut into the pie before it has cooled, the bottom of the pie will get soggy and the pie filling will not set up correctly. This takes 3-5 hours for the pie to cool completely. Once the pie has cooled, you can warm up a slice if you want to eat it warm.

Can I make this pie ahead of time?

I recommend making this pie a day before or at least the morning before you’d like to serve it. Once the pie has baked and cooled, cover it and let it sit at room temperature before serving the next day or that evening.

How do I store leftover cranberry apple pie?

This pie can be left covered at room temperature for 2 days. After that, place it in the refrigerator for up to 2 days or freeze the pie for up to 3 months. Individual slices can be thawed and reheated.

Cranberry Apple Pie with sourdough crust

Cranberry Apple Pie (with Sourdough Pie Crust)

Sweet apples, tart cranberries, a hint of almond and all nestled in a delicious flaky, buttery sourdough discard pie crust. This is the perfect pie for your Thanksgiving table or anytime apples and cranberries are in season.
Prep Time 40 mins
Cook Time 1 hr 15 mins
Cool Time 3 hrs
Course Dessert, pie
Cuisine American
Servings 1 9 inch pie

Ingredients
  

Sourdough Pie Crust

  • 325 grams all purpose flour divided into 150 grams and 175 grams (about 1 cup/1.25 cups total)
  • 16 grams sugar 1 Tablespoon
  • 6 grams salt 1 teaspoon
  • 222 grams unsalted butter 1 cup, cold
  • 135 grams sourdough discard 100% hydration, chilled is best, 1/2 cup
  • 20-40 grams ice water as needed (about 2-4 Tablespoons)
  • 1 medium egg reserved for egg wash
  • 16 grams granulated sugar for sprinkling on top of the pie before baking, (1 Tablespoon)

Cranberry Apple Pie Filling

  • 1000 grams honeycrisp or granny smith apples sliced, 8 cups or 7-8 apples
  • 150 grams fresh cranberries 1 1/2 cups
  • 250 grams granulated sugar 1 1/4 cup
  • 70 grams all purpose flour 1/2 cup
  • 8 grams salt 1 teaspoon
  • 6 grams ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon
  • 4 grams almond extract 1 teaspoon
  • 20 grams freshly squeezed lemon juice about 2 Tablespoons/half of a large lemon
  • 22 grams unsalted butter cut into small chunks, 1-2 Tablespoons

Instructions
 

Cranberry Apple Pie (with Sourdough Pie Crust)

  • In a large bowl, mix together 150 grams flour with sugar and salt.
  • Cut the cold, unsalted butter into small chunks (about 16 pieces per stick of butter) and add to the flour mixture. Using a pastry cutter, cut the butter into the flour mixture until all of the butter is moistened by the flour and forms into a thick paste (pictures and more detail in this post).
  • Add the remaining 175 grams (1 1/4 cup) of flour and use the pastry cutter to distribute the flour until the mixture looks crumbly.
  • Pour the chilled sourdough discard on top of the flour/butter mixture and stir to combine. Use your hands to form the dough into a ball. If the dough is too crumbly, add ice cold water a Tablespoon at time until it comes together.
  • Cut the ball in half and form two balls of dough. Wrap the balls in plastic wrap, press down on them to form a disc shape and stick in the refrigerator to chill. Chill the dough for 20 minutes in the refrigerator. The dough can be chilled for up to 3 days or frozen for up to 3 months.
  • While the dough is chilling, make the pie filling. Peel and core the apples using an apple peeler or a hand peeler. Slice apples into chunks and place in a large mixing bowl. Add the fresh cranberries, sugar, flour, salt, cinnamon, almond extract and lemon juice.
  • Pull the chilled dough out of the refrigerator. Lightly flour a pastry mat (or countertop). Roll out the first disc of dough a little over 10 inches round, turning about 30-45 degrees after every roll so you have an even circle of dough. Fold the dough into quarters and place it inside a pie plate, unfolding it and fitting it to the pie plate. Allow the pie crust to hang over the edges. Roll out the second/top crust to the same size or a little bit larger and set aside.
  • Fill the pie with the cranberry apple pie filling, mounding it up in the middle. Dot the pie filling with small chunks of butter (1-2 Tablespoons). Place the second pie crust on top of the pie filling. Use kitchen scissors to cut the overhang of the pie dough. Gather the edges around, folding the top crust edges under the bottom crust to form a seal for the pie and keep the juices from escaping.
  • Place the oven rack in the middle to lower half of the oven and preheat to 375 degrees. Crimp the edges of the pie and decorate the pie crust as desired. Slice two or more slits in the pie crust to allow steam to escape while baking.
  • Whisk a medium egg with a splash of water and spread the egg wash on top of the pie. Sprinkle the top of the pie with a Tablespoon of granulated sugar. Place a baking sheet in the bottom of the oven to catch any dripping from the pie as it bakes. Bake the pie for about 90 minutes until bubbly and brown on top. Put a few pieces of aluminum foil or a pie shield over the pie crust about halfway through if the pie crust is browning too quickly.
  • Let the pie cool completely before serving. This is important for the juices to gel together and prevents a soggy pie crust. Cool for about 3 hours. Slice and enjoy!

Notes

Sourdough Discard: This pie crust recipe works best with chilled sourdough discard straight from the refrigerator. Throw away any “hooch” that has collected on top of the discard. Smell the discard to make sure you are okay with the flavor it will bring (I don’t like to use discard longer than 2 weeks old in my discard recipes because the sour flavor can be overwhelming). Stir the discard and use in the recipe. The extra chill from the cold discard keeps the butter cold as you incorporate it into the crust. You can also use bubbly sourdough starter in this recipe if you don’t have any sourdough discard. 
Apples: I like this recipe best with tart/firm apples that hold up well for baking. Granny Smith and Honeycrisp apples are my favorite in this pie.
Keyword apple pie, cranberry apple pie, sourdough apple pie, sourdough cranberry apple pie, sourdough crust, sourdough discard recipe, sourdough pie crust, sourdough recipe

Rating: 1 out of 5.

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2 responses to “Cranberry Apple Pie (Sourdough Pie Crust)”

  1. Kris Avatar
    Kris

    This is so delicious! It earns my vote! 🥧🍎🍏

  2. […] tender, flaky and can stand up to any of your favorite fillings. It’s the perfect crust for my favorite cranberry apple pie and I love it in this summer Southern Tomato Pie […]

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Sourdough Pie Crust

It has taken me years to master a really good pie crust. I’ve always enjoyed this simple “press-in-the-pan” version but the flaky “Thanksgiving pie crust” or “Pi-day” pie crust seemed elusive. I’m happy to say that this sourdough discard pie crust has stepped up my pie game. Flaky layers, the tiniest bit of tang (if you want it) and just the easiest dough to work with. It’s so delicious and — even better — uses up that cold sourdough discard that is lurking in your refrigerator. Win-win! This sourdough pie crust is tender, flaky and can stand up to any of your favorite fillings. It’s the perfect crust for my favorite cranberry apple pie and I love it in this summer Southern Tomato Pie too.

The Science Behind Flaky Pie Crust

The secret to flaky pie crust: stop the gluten from developing in the flour. To do this, I use a two step process when making pie dough. First cut the butter into half of the flour mixture to form a thick paste. The butter completely coats all of the flour, coating each piece of flour in fat. Think of what happens when you have butter on your hands and you go to wash them: it’s hard to get your hands clean unless you use soap. Gluten strands start to form when the flour comes in contact with water. Butter makes it difficult for the flour to absorb water which in turn prevents the development of gluten in the pie dough. After you’ve got a thick paste, add the rest of the flour and mix the dough until you have small crumbs before adding in the sourdough discard and a little extra water if you need it. This process results in a dough that is very easy to work with and will bake up into long thin layers of flaky dough.

Sourdough Discard in Pie Crust

I love making this pie crust with sourdough discard straight from my refrigerator. Make sure you are using 100% hydration sourdough discard (equal parts flour/water). If your discard is not 100% hydration, you may need to add more or less ice water/flour to the dough. The extra chill from the cold discard keeps the butter cold as you incorporate it into the dough. You can also use bubbly sourdough starter in this recipe if you don’t have any sourdough discard. Older discard gives a beautiful, almost cheesy flavor to the pie crust which compliments savory pie, like this tomato pie perfectly. For sweet pies, I like to use a fresh discard that doesn’t have lingering sour notes and add a little extra sugar to sourdough pie crust giving it the perfect flavor. It’s important to use cold starter and ice water (if needed) to keep the butter cold and the pastry easy to roll.

How to Make Flaky Sourdough Pie Crust

1. Use a pastry cutter or food processor. cut in the butter with half of the flour mixture. It will form a thick paste.
2. Add the rest of the flour and use the pastry cutter to distribute the flour mixture evenly throughout the dough. It will resemble crumbs.
3. Pour in the chilled sourdough discard and use your hands to incorporate and form the dough into a ball. The crumbs should begin to form larger clusters and clump together. If the dough is too crumbly, add a Tablespoon of chilled water at a time until the dough clumps together and forms a ball.
4. Cut crust in half, flatten into a circular shape and refrigerate for 20-30 minutes or up to 3 days. This recipe makes two crusts, a top and bottom. You can freeze the crust for up to 3 months. Pull out and refrigerate to thaw before using.

Rolling Out the Sourdough Pie Crust

On a very lightly-floured pastry mat or surface, roll out the chilled pie crust. Turn the crust after every roll about 45 degrees so that you get an even, circular shape. I love using a pastry mat to roll out pie crust on. It’s so much easier to make sure the crust is the right size for your pie plate. I often use a glass pyrex pie plate for my pies because I can see them baked all the way through, and that’s the way my mom did it — there’s something to be said for tradition! Fold the pie crust into quarters and transfer the pie dough to a 9 inch pie plate. For a pie with only one crust, crimp the edges, prick with a fork and bake blind. You can use pie weights to help the crust stay in place if you aren’t filling the crust and baking it right away. If you are using a double crust, fill the bottom crust with pie filling. Roll out the second crust and lay it on top of the pie, crimping the edges as you go. Bake pie according to recipe’s directions.

Freezing or Refrigerating Pie Crust

This sourdough pie crust recipe makes two crusts, a top and bottom. The dough can be refrigerated for 3 days–the longer it sits in the refrigerator, the more flavor the crust will have. It could lend to a more sour flavor as well, so be careful how long you leave it in the refrigerator. Sourdough Pie Crust can also be wrapped and frozen for up to 3 months. Pull it out of the freezer and set in the refrigerator to thaw before using.

Crimping the Edges

Bottom or Single Crust: For a pie with one crust, use kitchen scissors to cut away the extra crust that is overhanging the pie plate. Save it for patching the crust as needed or to bake into little “pie chips.” Roll the crust under just a bit to make a uniform circular edge. Then take your knuckles on one hand and a finger on the other. Put your knuckles on the inside or outside (either works) of the crust and press in between the knuckles with your finger, creating a crimped edge. Repeat this process around the pie.

Top Crust: For a pie with a top crust, prepare the bottom crust without crimping the edges. Roll the top crust under the top edge of the bottom crust, sealing the pie shut. Then proceed to crimp the edges. Slice a few holes in the top of the pie with a large knife to vent steam while the pie bakes.