Sourdough “Pizza Oven” Pizza

I am a big-time pizza lover. My whole family loves pizza and Friday night pizza has been on the rotation for many years. We love this recipe that we’ve been using in our regular oven, but recently we added an Ooni Koda pizza oven to our appliances. Even though it was quite the long wait (supply chain issues), we love the way this pizza oven cooks and everything that we pull out of it is top notch! Check out this naan bread I made that is one of our favorites. I decided to combine my love for sourdough everything with my love for pizza and have found the perfect sourdough pizza recipe for our family. I’ve made it a number of times and will continue using this recipe for years to come. It is delicious, the perfect chewy crust and makes the most delicious pizza. We are obsessed and it has revitalized our family pizza nights.

Type 00 Flour or Bread Flour?

Ooni gives instructions with their pizza oven to use a special Italian flour, “type 00.” Type 00 flour is known for making traditional Neapolitan-style pizza (the type of pizza this recipe is trying its best to mimic) and it historically gives a crispy, thin crust while being chewy at the same time. In Europe, flour is categorized by how finely ground it is, not by protein content (which is what we use in America to categorize our flour). You can buy type 00 flour used in Italian pizza crust in some stores (our local Kroger carries it now!) or on Amazon, but with a big family that gets a little expensive if you want to make pizza often. An option that I prefer is to use American bread flour with about 11-12% protein content. I use unbleached bread flour from my local mill that is finely ground. The combination of bread flour, a long rise, high hydration content and sourdough helps to soften the gluten and to produce a light and airy crust that mimics the type 00 flour.

Side by Side Comparison of Sourdough Pizza

I actually did a side-by-side comparison of this recipe using both bread flour and type 00 flour and guess what?! My family preferred the pizza made with the bread flour. I thought the difference was negligible between the two and both are good options for the pizza. They both had a light, airy crust thanks to the high hydration, which produced lots of air pockets and a beautiful rise. Both had good flavor from being refrigerated overnight and baked up the next day. If you’d like to save a little money, look for a bread flour with 11-12% protein content that is finely ground, and you will have a much more affordable way to make pizza night happen weekly in your pizza oven.

Sourdough Starter

I feed my sourdough starter usually once a day, sometimes twice depending on how often I’m baking. This recipe uses 100 grams of ripe sourdough starter. This can be discard from the last few days or starter that is at its peak point. If you want to make starter specifically for this recipe, take a teaspoon of starter and feed it 75 grams of flour, 75 grams of water. Stir it, cover it and wait for 6-8 hours for the starter to double in size. Then use it in this recipe for sourdough pizza.

Sample Schedule for Sourdough Pizza

Day 1

  • 8 AM Mix together the dough ingredients with a stand mixer/dough hook
  • 8:30 AM Bulk Rest – perform 1st fold
  • 9:00 AM Bulk Rest – perform 2nd fold
  • 9:30 AM Bulk Rest – perform 3rd fold
  • 10:00 AM Bulk Rest – perform 4th fold (at this point the dough should be strong and smooth)
  • 11:00 AM Cover the dough and place in the refrigerator overnight
Dough risen and ready to be separated and shaped into balls on day 2

Day 2

  • 8 AM Shape dough into balls, cover and rest at room temperature
  • 1 PM Check on dough, place in refrigerator until ready to bake 
  • 5 PM Preheat pizza oven
  • 5:30 PM Take dough out of refrigerator, shape into pizzas, top and bake

Shaping the Balls of Sourdough Pizza Dough

The more you work with dough, the easier this will become. Don’t worry if it seems hard at first. It will turn out okay! To shape a ball of dough, pick it up in your hand and gently pull the dough together as you turn it in your hand, forming a ball. Then take the ball and tightly move it in a circular motion on the countertop to seal the ball. You should be left with a taught, round ball of dough. It will flatten as it rises, but this shaping process sets your pizza crust up for a successful rise in the oven.

How I pre-shape pizza dough

Working with Cold Dough

The process for making this pizza dough is two days but it is not a lot of hands-on time. Most of the work is done while the dough is resting. I don’t like to add extra flour to the dough while I’m working with it on the counter. Cold dough is easier to shape without extra flour. Once your dough has been shaped into balls, let it rise at room temperature for 5-6 hours. You will notice it expand and puff up. Once the dough has risen, stick it back in the refrigerator until ready to make the pizzas. Cold dough doesn’t stick as much to the pizza peel, especially with a sprinkle of cornmeal underneath it. Work quickly so it doesn’t warm up too much and your dough should slide right off the pizza peel or wooden cutting board.

Cornmeal and an Ooni Pizza Oven

I like to use cornmeal on the bottom of my pizzas. This is not necessarily traditional, but I have found cornmeal is the best way to provide a little friction between the wet dough and the pizza peel or cutting board. The friction makes it much easier to launch into the pizza oven. Be careful that you don’t use too much cornmeal because it can burn up in the pizza oven; you really just want a light dusting of cornmeal.

Too Many Toppings?

With this pizza recipe, it is possible to have too many toppings. Part of the beauty of this style of pizza is in the simplicity of the ingredients. This doesn’t mean you shouldn’t experiment. You should! Just be careful to not load your pizza up with too many toppings. It will make it difficult to get your pizza into the pizza oven without half of your pizza collapsing, giving you a melty/cheesy mess that will need to burn up before baking your next pizza—not that I have experienced this or anything 🙂

Launching and Baking Pizza In an Ooni Pizza Oven

The more you make the pizza, the better you will get at this step. I like to use a wooden cutting board to assemble my pizza on. Spread a little cornmeal and place the stretched dough on top of the cornmeal. Press the pizza into a circular shape and top with pizza sauce, chunks of mozzarella and any other toppings you’d like. Check that your pizza is not sticking to the board (if it is, lightly lift it off), and scoot the pizza toward the end of the board. Launch the pizza with a quick thrust of the board into the pizza oven. Do not stick your fingers into the oven! Have a pizza peel and a fork nearby. Once the pizza has cooked about 45 seconds and starts to look crispy, pull it out with the pizza peel, rotate it 180 degrees (one half turn) with the fork and bake for another 30-45 seconds until the crust is perfect.

Pizza Oven vs. Conventional Oven

This pizza recipe works best in a pizza oven. I’ve made it many times in an Ooni Koda 16 pizza oven. You will get the best texture, taste and crispness using the high heat and baking stone of a pizza oven. If you don’t have a pizza oven, you can still make good pizza from this recipe, though you may want to check out this one instead. Crank your home oven up to the highest temperature it will go (550 is the temperature I tested it at). Place a pizza stone in the oven and let it pre-heat for at least 30-40 minutes. This long pre-heat is crucial to the texture of the pizza dough. Proceed with the recipe as written and bake the pizza in the regular oven for 5-7 minutes, until the dough is puffed up and baked through.

The top pizza was baked in an Ooni Pizza Oven. The bottom pizza was baked on a pizza stone in a conventional oven at 550 degrees.

Pizza Sauce for Sourdough Pizza

Neapolitan style pizza traditionally uses a fresh, non-cooked sauce. We prefer our pizza with a cooked sauce and the recipe I have listed is one of our favorites. It doesn’t take too long to make and can keep fresh in the fridge for a week or two. I like to make this sauce, cool it down and use it on our homemade pizza nights. A jarred sauce will work too, just find one that you love.

Why do I need to refrigerate the dough in this sourdough pizza? Can I skip this step and make it in one day?

The long fermentation time in the refrigerator helps the dough build flavor and softens the gluten in the dough which allows for lots of air pockets which means a light, airy and open pizza crust. Don’t skip this step!

What are the Best Pizza Topping Combinations in Sourdough Pizza?

Traditionally this Neapolitan-style pizza is made with a simple tomato sauce, chunks of mozzarella cheese and fresh basil. We love making a “white” pizza with a bit of olive oil, goat cheese, mozzarella, roasted garlic and adding a bit of arugula and balsamic vinegar on top after it bakes. Our kids love traditional pepperoni on this pizza dough too.

Can I use Sourdough Discard that is a few days old in this sourdough pizza?

Yes! Due to the long, slow rise, sourdough discard works great in this recipe. The older the discard, the more soudough flavor the crust will have.

Where Can I buy “type 00” flour?

I buy it online on Amazon and most recently I’ve found some at our local Kroger.

Can this Sourdough Pizza Recipe be made in one day?

It can, but it really tastes much better when it’s had time to ferment overnight in the refrigerator. The long rise breaks down the gluten making an amazing, tender, chewy & light pizza crust.

Pizza night has never been better with this sourdough pizza in an Ooni Pizza oven. Give it a try! I hope you’ll love it as much as we do.

Sourdough Pizza for a Pizza Oven

Chewy, tender and perfect Neapolitan-style sourdough pizza made for a pizza oven. This is the perfect pizza crust for family pizza night or to make when you are craving delicious pizza.
Prep Time 1 d
Cook Time 20 mins
Total Time 1 d 17 mins
Course Main Course
Cuisine American, Italian
Servings 8 6-8 inch pizzas

Ingredients
  

Sourdough Pizza Crust

  • 100 grams ripe sourdough starter 100% hydration see recipe notes
  • 400 grams water room temperature
  • 575 grams bread flour see recipe notes
  • 65 grams whole wheat flour finely ground
  • 4 grams diastatic malt powder see recipe notes
  • 12 grams salt
  • 1/2 cup cornmeal reserved for sprinkling when shaping pizza

Pizza Toppings

  • 16 slices mozzarella cheese good quality
  • fresh basil torn
  • 2 cups pizza sauce recipe below works great
  • 1/2 cup parmesan cheese
  • other toppings as desired

Pizza Sauce

  • 1 Tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 1 Tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic pressed/diced
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper chili pepper for spicy–up this if you want more spicy
  • 28 oz crushed tomatoes nothing else in it but tomato
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2-3 springs basil with stems/leaves on

Instructions
 

Sourdough Pizza Dough

    Day 1

    • To a stand mixer, add the ripe sourdough starter and water. Mix with your hands until mostly dissolved. Add the bread flour, whole wheat flour, diastatic malt powder and salt. Mix together with a dough whisk or spoon until a shaggy dough forms.
    • Using the dough hook on your stand mixer, mix the dough for 7-8 minutes until smooth. Alternatively you can knead the dough by hand for 8-10 minutes until smooth. Transfer the dough to a bowl or container.
    • Cover the bowl and allow the dough to rest for about 2-3 hours on the counter at room temperature (if your kitchen is warmer err on the side of 2 hours; colder err on the side of 3-4 hours).
    • During this bulk rest, perform a series of stretch and folds every half hour to continue developing the dough.
    • After the bulk rise, cover the dough and place in the refrigerator overnight for a long, slow rise.

    Day 2

    • Add a little olive oil to one or two baking dishes or pans with high edges.
    • Pull the dough out of the refrigerator and separate into 8 pieces, about 145-150 grams per piece. This will make about a 6-8 inch pizza. If you'd like to make larger pizzas, divide the dough into 4 balls about 290 grams a piece.
    • Use your fingers to shape the dough into 8 tight balls. Pinch the dough together into a ball shape and drag in a circular motion on your countertop to form a taught, tight ball. Place the dough ball into the prepared, lightly oiled pan. Repeat with the next dough ball, placing it apart from the first ball to allow room for the dough to rise. Continue this process until the dough balls have been shaped.
    • Cover the pans with plastic wrap and leave on the counter to rise for 4-6 hours (depending on the temperature in your kitchen). The dough will puff up a bit and flatten out to a disc-like shape.
    • Check on your dough after about 4 hours. If it has puffed and flattened considerably, move on to the next step. If not, give it a little more time to rise. At this point, the dough balls can be placed in the refrigerator to use later that day or the next day.

    Baking the Pizza

    • Preheat a pizza oven to 700-800 degrees (see recipe note about using a regular oven) and place the dough in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes while setting up the pizza toppings. This dough is easiest to work with chilled.
    • On a pizza peel or large wooden cutting board, sprinkle cornmeal to dust the board. The cornmeal provides the friction needed to launch the pizza into the oven. Take one piece of dough and stretch it with your hands to form a circle. Place it on top of the cornmeal and continue working it around in a circle until you a 6-8 inch pizza shape.
    • Work quickly to top the pizza with about 2-3 Tablespoons pizza sauce. Tear the mozzarella into pieces and place pieces on top of the pizza dough. Tear the fresh basil and sprinkle with parmesan if desired. Check that the dough is not sticking to the board (this can happen if you don't work quickly enough). If it is sticking, unstick it with your fingers, add a bit of cornmeal if needed and try again.
    • Launch your pizza into the pre-heated pizza oven with a quick thrust forward. Let the pizza cook for about 45 seconds, then using the pizza peel pull the pizza out of the oven, turn it with a fork and return it to the pizza oven for another 30-45 seconds. This ensures that the pizza is cooked on both sides. You can watch a video of this process here.
    • Repeat the process with the rest of your pizza dough, adding whatever toppings you desire and enjoy!

    Pizza Sauce

    • To a small saucepan add the butter, olive and garlic over medium heat. Sautee garlic until fragrant, about 3 minutes. Add the oregano, salt & pepper and sautee 1 more minute. Add the crushed tomatoes and stir.
    • Slice the onion in half and add to the sauce. Add two sprigs of fresh basil to the sauce. Simmer on low heat for about an hour until the sauce is reduced and concentrated. Remove the basil and onion. Season with a teaspoon of sugar and more salt if desired.
    • Remove to container and let cool before using on pizza dough. Sauce can be refrigerated for a week or two if desired.

    Notes

    Sourdough Starter: This recipe is based on 100% hydration sourdough starter (fed equal parts flour/water). You can use bubbly sourdough starter or sourdough discard for this recipe.
    Flour: Most recipes for Neapolitan-style pizza call for special Italian type 00 flour. Italian type 00 flour is difficult to come by in a typical U.S. grocery store but can be easily found on Amazon. If you are looking for a more cost-effective option, and the one I use most regularly, I’ve had very good results using bread flour with around a 12% protein content.
    Diastatic Malt Powder: This helps the pizza dough in its long rise and gives the dough a strong rise and a caramelized color crust. You can buy it on Amazon or check your local grocery. If you don’t have any on hand, leave it out.
    Oven: This pizza recipe works best for a pizza oven. I’ve made it many times in an Ooni Koda 16 pizza oven. You will get the best texture, taste and crispness using the high heat and baking stone of a pizza oven. If you don’t have a pizza oven, you can still make good pizza from this recipe. Crank your home oven up to the highest temperature it will go (550 is the temperature I tested it at). Place a pizza stone in the oven and let it pre-heat for at least 30-40 minutes. This long pre-heat is crucial to the texture of the pizza dough. Proceed with the recipe as written and bake the pizza in the regular oven for 5-7 minutes, until the dough is puffed up and baked through.
    Keyword beginner sourdough, neapolitan style pizza, ooni koda, ooni pizza oven, sourdough pizza

    Rating: 1 out of 5.

    Disclaimer: I am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed for me to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com. As an Amazon Associate, I earn a very small amount from qualifying purchases.

    Follow me on Instagram @amybakesbread, like Amy Bakes Bread on Facebook or follow me on Pinterest for more baking ideas. Please share this recipe if you enjoyed it! Post a photo and tag me @amybakesbread so I can see your bake.

    Fondue Two Ways: Classic Swiss and Rich Chocolate

    We were babies!

    Many years ago (almost fifteen if I’m being exact), I ate my most memorable fondue dinner. My husband and I were honeymooning in Europe. We had a small wedding and spent the money we would have spent on a fancy party traveling around Europe for five weeks. This was definitely one of our better decisions. One evening we found ourselves in the tiny mountain village of Gimmelwald, Switzerland surrounded by the Swiss Alps. We were traveling on a budget trying to eke out the most of our trip but when we saw fondue on the menu, we threw caution (and a whole lot of Swiss Francs) to the wind and enjoyed one of the most memorable meals we’ve eaten together. Melty cheese, gorgeous mountains and two kids in love. Definitely a moment to remember.

    Jump to Fondue Two Ways Recipe

    Alcohol Free Fondue

    Ever since that evening, I’ve been trying to recreate our fondue experience…sans beautiful mountains and overlooking the bluegrass fields of Kentucky instead. This recipe lives up to the hype in our minds of the perfect Swiss Fondue. It uses equal parts Gruyere and Emmentaler cheese which are pricey but totally worth it. We are not the biggest fans of alcohol in fondue and find it a bit overpowering, so we like to use chicken stock in place of the traditional white wine. If you prefer the flavor of white wine, by all means, substitute that for the chicken stock. You can add a few Tablespoons of Kirschwasser for a more traditional flavor too. I think this Classic Swiss Fondue recipe is pretty perfect without the alcohol and our kids love it too.

    Cheese, Cheese and More Cheese

    Can you substitute other types of cheese in this recipe? You can, but it may not give you the traditional sharp Swiss flavor that we love so much. That doesn’t mean it won’t be good. If you are looking to substitute cheese, I would look for a good melting cheese. Jarlsburg, French Comte or a generic Swiss cheese can be used. A pro tip: If you are looking for one of the easiest fondue recipes ever, just pick up a block of brie cheese. Cut off the casing and melt it in a fondue pot. Not quite as flavorful as our favorite recipe but delicious just the same. We love the creaminess of the classic Swiss fondue recipe and the sharpness of the Swiss flavors with some crusty bread or apples. 

    Rich Chocolate Fondue

    In our family it’s not a fondue night without chocolate fondue. Our kids love dipping fresh fruit, marshmallows, muffins or angel food cake in the chocolate mixture and it makes for a very fun and memorable evening. This chocolate fondue recipe I’m sharing below does not make a whole lot of chocolate fondue. You may want to double it if you are just making it on its own. For our family, after eating the cheese fondue we don’t need a huge pot of chocolate fondue because our bellies are so full of cheese!  I love this chocolate fondue because it is downright delicious and so easy to whip up.

    What to Dip

    A good crusty bread cut into chunks is a must for cheese fondue. We also like cutting up apple slices to dip in the cheese. I will often set out bowls of nuts, cold cuts, boiled potatoes or other easy-to-eat foods with the cheese fondue. For the chocolate fondue I scour my fridge and pantry for fresh fruit and marshmallows. If I can’t find angel food cake or pound cake I will cut up muffins into small pieces to dip in the fondue. I love how adaptable fondue is to what I have on hand. It’s not hard for anything to taste good covered in cheese or chocolate.

    Fondue Tradition

    In our family, fondue has become a tradition. We like to have fondue for our New Years Eve dinner, setting goals and toasting around the table to the new year. We also eat this traditional fondue (cheese and chocolate) for Valentines Day. It’s a dinner my kids look forward to all year long. Every so often we’ll pull out the fondue set for a back-to-school dinner or some other special occasion. We love eating fondue together because it slows down the meal and lets us enjoy and create family memories together. We’ve had so many good times gathered around the fondue pot as a family; laughing and enjoying delicious cheese and chocolate fondue.

    Fondue Pot

    Do you need a fondue pot to make fondue? Technically, no. If you are planning to have a one-off fondue dinner, then maybe you don’t need to invest in a fondue pot. If you want to make it a yearly family tradition, I think it’s worth it! We started off with this fondue pot (affiliate link) and after using it a couple of years, upgraded to this one. We definitely prefer the Swissmar pot (affiliate link) because it heats so evenly, but the Cuisinart is a good value too. It can burn easier on the bottom, so make sure you stir your fondue every so often.

    Fondue is fun and has become a wonderful tradition for our family. Our kids look forward to it every New Years and Valentines Day (and sometimes on other special occasions). We love these recipes because they are simple, special and delicious. I hope you love them too! Happy New Year!

    Fondue Two Ways: Classic Swiss Fondue and Rich Chocolate Fondue

    The perfect creamy and classic Swiss cheese fondue and a rich chocolate fondue for dessert. Use these two recipes for a perfect special occasion dinner!
    Prep Time 20 mins
    Course Dessert, Main Course
    Cuisine American, Swiss
    Servings 6 people

    Ingredients
      

    Classic Swiss Fondue

    • 2 cups high quality Gruyere cheese, freshly grated see recipe note
    • 2 cups high quality Emmentaler, freshly grated see recipe note
    • 4 teaspoons cornstarch
    • 1/2 cup chicken stock *substitute white wine if desired
    • 1/2 cup milk
    • 1 Tablespoon lemon juice
    • pinch of nutmeg
    • pinch of ground pepper
    • 1 loaf soft or crusty french bread cubed

    Rich Chocolate Fondue

    • 1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips can substitute for your favorite chocolate
    • 1/4 cup heavy cream
    • 2-3 Tablespoons milk
    • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
    • an assortment of items to dip ie: fresh fruit, marshmallows, angel food cake, etc…

    Instructions
     

    Classic Swiss Fondue

    • Grate the cheese. I sometimes use a food processor for the harder cheese and it makes the process very fast.
    • To a medium-sized bowl, add the cheese and 4 teaspoons of cornstarch. Coat the cheese in the cornstarch and mix until completely combined. Set aside.
    • To a liquid measuring cup, add the chicken stock and milk. Whisk together.
    • Heat the fondue pot, (affiliate link) and add the chicken stock and milk to the pot. Warm to a weak simmer. Then add the lemon juice and continue to simmer (weak simmer).
    • Taking a handful at a time, add the cheese to the pot, stirring constantly. Wait for the cheese to melt before adding in another handful. Continue this process until all the cheese has been added to the fondue pot.
    • Add a pinch of nutmeg and pepper to taste.
    • Eat immediately by dipping the crusty bread into the fondue. Enjoy!

    Rich Chocolate Fondue

    • To a fondue pot (affiliate link) or small saucepan, add the chocolate chips, heavy cream and a Tablespoon of milk.
    • Stir the mixture until the chocolate is completely melted and smooth. Add a Tablespoon of milk as needed to thin the chocolate fondue. Stir in the vanilla extract.
    • Keep the chocolate warm as you dip fresh fruit, marshmallows, muffins or angel food cake into the chocolate fondue. Enjoy!

    Notes

    Recipe Notes:
    Pre-Shredded Cheese: This recipe works best when you use block cheese that is freshly grated. Pre-shredded cheese often is coated with preservatives which means they don’t melt together as well during cooking. 
    Classic Swiss Cheese Fondue: Traditional cheese fondue is made with alcohol. We prefer the flavor of the fondue made with chicken stock (and our kids do too). If you prefer, add 1/2 cup of your favorite white wine (or other alcohol) in place of the chicken stock for a deeper flavor.
    Rich Chocolate Fondue: This recipe makes the perfect amount for dessert after eating cheese fondue. If you are making this recipe without eating a meal beforehand, you may want to double it.
    Keyword fondue

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    white texas sheet cake

    White Texas Sheet Cake

    As a kid, the 4th of July was one of my favorite holidays. We would caravan out to visit grandparents and extended family for a week or two of summer fun. The week was filled with playing with cousins, snacking on pretzels from my grandma’s kitchen, backyard BBQs with homemade ice cream and sleeping outside on the street the night before the big 4th of July parade to save our big family a place to watch along the parade route. Evenings were capped off with sparklers and a fireworks show…nostalgic Independence Day at its finest. 

    Top White Texas Sheet Cake with Your Favorite Fruit

    We don’t have those exact same traditions with my little family now, but we do celebrate as best we can wherever we are. This year we are hoping to catch a fireworks show and spend the day with family. I’m also hoping it will include my favorite White Texas Sheet Cake for a festive dessert. This white version of a Texas Sheet Cake can be gussied up with blue and red fruit for a festive treat, or topped with toasted coconut for a delicious coconut version.

    Simple and Delicious Sheet Cake

    White Texas Sheet cake is the perfect cake to take to a large gathering or family party because it is baked on an 18 by 13 size half sheet pan (affiliate link to my favorite pan). It takes 10 minutes to mix the cake batter together, twenty minutes to bake and five minutes to decorate. The almond extract adds a delicious “wedding-cake-esque” flavor that is so delicious, especially paired with fresh raspberries. If you aren’t a fan of almond flavor, no worries…you can leave it out or substitute some vanilla extract. Easy peasy and oh so delicious. 

    My kids especially love being able to decorate a giant sheet cake. I like to set out all the berries or other toppings and let them make whatever decoration they want. I love the combination of fresh raspberries and blueberries, but any fresh berry will work. 

    White Texas Sheet Cake: Coconut Version

    I’ve often made this sheet cake for baby showers or other events and top it with toasted coconut. Did you know you can toast your coconut in the microwave? Place 1 cup of sweetened, shredded coconut on a plate. Microwave in 15-30 second increments, stirring between sessions. The coconut will brown right up after a minute or two and you will have the perfect, simple toasted coconut. You could also use the oven to get your coconut nice and toasty if you don’t want to use a microwave. The recipe for the coconut version of this cake is in the recipe notes.

    Happy Independence Day

    However you celebrate Independence Day or whatever your traditions are, I hope this White Texas Sheet Cake will make it to your family’s table. Have a wonderful holiday weekend and don’t forget to tag me if you make it! I’d love to see what you create. Yum!

    white texas sheet cake

    White Texas Sheet Cake

    White Texas sheet cake topped with a delicious almond icing and decorated with fresh berries is the perfect treat for your 4th of July party.
    Prep Time 25 mins
    Cook Time 20 mins
    Course Dessert
    Cuisine American
    Servings 24 slices

    Ingredients
      

    White Texas Sheet Cake

    • 2 cups all purpose flour
    • 2 cups granulated sugar
    • 1 teaspoon baking powder
    • 1 teaspoon salt
    • 1 cup unsalted butter
    • 1 cup water
    • 1/2 cup sour cream
    • 2 large eggs lightly beaten
    • 1 teaspoon almond extract

    Icing and Toppings

    • 1/2 cup unsalted butter
    • 1/4 cup milk 2% or whole is best
    • 1/2 teaspoon almond extract
    • pinch of salt
    • 3 cups powdered sugar
    • blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, toasted coconut, chopped pecans, etc… for topping

    Instructions
     

    White Texas Sheet Cake

    • Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Prepare a large half sheet pan and spray with non-stick cooking spray.
    • In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Stir together and set aside. In a separate, microwave safe bowl (or in a saucepan on the stove), melt the butter. Mix in the water, sour cream, eggs and almond extract. Stir until combined.
    • Pour the liquid mixture onto the flour mixture and stir until combined. The batter should be lump-free. Pour the batter into the pan and spread evenly in the pan. Bake for 20 minutes or until a toothpick is inserted in the center of the cake and it comes out clean with no batter left on it. If wet batter is on the toothpick, let it bake a little bit longer, checking frequently so as not to over-bake the cake.

    Almond Icing

    • While the cake bakes, make the icing. In a microwave safe bowl (or a saucepan on the stove), melt the butter. Add the milk, salt, almond extract and powdered sugar. Whisk together to form a smooth, liquid icing.
    • As soon as the cake comes out of the oven, pour the icing on top of the cake and spread evenly to all the edges of the cake. 
    • Top the cake with fruit, toasted coconut or pecans. We like making it into the shape of a flag for a 4th of July BBQ or to top with toasted coconut for a party. Check the recipe notes for a coconut version of this delicious cake. Enjoy!

    Notes

    For a coconut version, add 1 teaspoon of coconut extract to the batter and ½ teaspoon of coconut extract to the icing. Top cake with 1 cup of toasted coconut.
    Keyword 4th of july, independence day, sheet cake, white texas sheet cake
    Watch us make White Texas Sheet Cake for a Memorial Day BBQ

    Rating: 1 out of 5.

    Disclaimer: I am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed for me to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com. As an Amazon Associate, I earn a very small amount from qualifying purchases.

    Follow me on Instagram @amybakesbread, like Amy Bakes Bread on Facebook or follow me on Pinterest for more baking ideas. Please share this recipe if you enjoyed it! Post a photo and tag me @amybakesbread so I can see your bake.

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    Snow Day Doughnuts

    I grew up in an area of the United States where we didn’t have many (or any!) snow days. When we moved to Kentucky and my kids started school, I couldn’t believe the amount of snow days they had – for an area that typically doesn’t get much snow! If we get any little bit of snow (or sometimes even a forecast for snow), school is often cancelled. Our area of Kentucky has lots of small country roads, a small amount of equipment to deal with snow and it’s not safe for school busses to travel in those conditions. I had previously taught school in Utah where we had many feet of snow every school year and never had a snow day once. This was a big change!

    The amount of snow we get on a typical snow day…

    Our first year in Kentucky we implemented a family tradition to help us look forward to the beginning of “snow day” season and the fun it can bring. Enter: Snow Day Doughnuts! My kids look forward to this tradition every year now and are always begging for snow long before it’s in the forecast.

    Snow Day Doughnut!

    A little superstition for you: In Kentucky, the night before snow is predicted in the weather forecast, kids come home from school and do these three things:

    1. Put a spoon under your pillow
    2. Wear your pajamas inside out
    3. Flush three ice cubes down the toilet

    Kids head to bed and pray that tomorrow will bring snow. 

    Two boys praying for no school: inside out pajamas, spoon under pillow…and they did flush 3 ice cubes down the toilet too!

    For my kids the first snow day of the year is particularly special. Not only do we have a day off school and snow to play in, but we make Snow Day Doughnuts! This is the one time a year we try our hand at making doughnuts…fun for everyone. An enriched dough (that means butter, egg, and milk or fat) that is fried and dipped in icing? Sign me up!!! 

    I usually research a few recipes the week before it calls for the first snow (thank you Google) and make sure I have the ingredients on hand. We mix up the dough in the morning, play in the snow for an hour while it rises and then come inside to cut out the shapes we want to make. It’s usually a combination of regular round doughnuts, doughnut holes and filled doughnuts. 

    Making lots of shapes for our doughnuts

    A few words of caution:

    1. When you roll your dough out, be strategic and use up as much space as you can the first time. Doughnut dough doesn’t do very well being smooshed back together to roll out again (not like sugar cookies).
    2. You don’t need a doughnut cutter, a round glass works well. We’ve found the cap of a plastic water bottle is also great for cutting the hole out of the center of the doughnut.
    3. Make your “scraps” into doughnut holes OR roll them together to form a roll shape for a “filled” doughnut–they may look a little craggy, but they will taste good.

    The kids go out to play again while the doughnuts rise a second time, and I text friends and neighbors to invite them to a doughnut and hot chocolate party at our house. I really think this is one of my kids favorite days of the year. After a few times sledding down the neighborhood hill, a couple snowball fights, snow angels, you name it, the kids start straggling in.

    Gotta love that Kentucky snow 🙂

    I keep a pot of hot chocolate on one burner and hot oil on the second. As the oil heats, I test a few of the doughnut holes and try to keep the temperature steady. If they burn quickly you’ll know you need to lower the temperature. If they take too long to fry (longer than 30 seconds per side) you’ll know to turn the heat up.

    Cocoa and doughnuts…makes for the perfect first snow day of the year!

    Once your doughnuts are fried, it’s time for the fun part. Toppings!!! We whipped up some vanilla icing and chocolate icing and put out a bunch of sprinkles for kids to go crazy with. There’s nothing better on the first snow day of the year than a fresh, home-made doughnut and a cup of hot chocolate…except for sharing it with friends that is!

    Did you have snow days as a kid? What is your favorite snow day tradition?